Antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria causing urinary tract infections in Latin American hospitals: Results from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1997)

Helio S. Sader, Ronald N. Jones, Patricia L. Winokur, Michael A. Pfaller, Gary V. Doern, Timothy Barrett, Helio S. Sader, J. Sampaio, C. Zoccoli, J. M. Casellas, J. Smayevsky, V. Prado, E. Palavecino, H. Bagnulo, J. A. Robledo, J. S. Osornio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among 469 pathogens isolated as a significant cause of urinary tract infections in 10 Latin American medical centers. Methods: Consecutively collected isolates were susceptibility tested by broth microdilution methods, and selected isolates were characterized by molecular typing methods. Results: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates revealed high rates of resistance to broad-spectrum penicillins and to fluoroquinolones. Ceftazidime MICs of ≥ 2 mg/L, suggesting the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), were observed in 37.7% of K. pneumoniae and 8.3% of Escherichia coli isolates. Enterobacter spp. isolates were characterized by high resistance rates to ciprofloxacin (35%) and to ceftazidime (45%), but they generally remained susceptible to cefepime (95% susceptible). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. were highly resistant to ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime. Imipenem was active against 80% of P. aeruginosa and 93% of Acinetobacter spp. isolates. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate a high level of resistance to various classes of antimicrobial agents among isolates causing nosocomial urinary tract infections in Latin American hospitals. Clonal dissemination of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae strains was infrequent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)478-487
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume5
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1999
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors wish to thank the following persons for their significant contributions to this manuscript: K. Meyer, L. Schomberg, R. Hollis, M. Erwin, S. Coffman and A. Gales. This study was supported by an educational/research grant from Bristol Myers Squibb.

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance surveillance
  • SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program
  • Urinary tract infection

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