Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with and without community-acquired Pneumonia. What do PCR and serology say?

Angela Rocio Copete, Angela Rocio Copete, Cristian Vera, Cristian Vera, Mariana Herrera, Mariana Herrera, Yudy Alexandra Aguilar, Zulma Vanessa Rueda, Lázaro Agustín Vélez

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    5 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Background: IgM titers of Mycoplasma pneumoniae can remain high for months or years, and specific DNA can be detected in asymptomatic people. Methods: We compared the performance of serology and PCR in children with and without community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) for the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae. Results: In children with CAP, a positive test by M. pneumoniae (PCR and/or paired serology or both) were found in 13.9%. Of these, 10.3% were positive by multiplex PCR (Seeplex-Seegen), and 6.7% exhibited quadrupled titers (22 for IgG, 6 for IgM and 5 for both). Both tests were positive in 2.8% of cases. In the group without CAP, 3.3% were positive by PCR. Thirty-two percent of children with CAP and 38.3% of healthy children had IgM titers >11 in the acute phase. Conclusions: The detection of IgM is not useful for diagnosing acute M. pneumoniae infection, and a positive PCR result can be due to colonization and not infection. New and better diagnostic techniques are required.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)E104-E108
    JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - 2020

    Bibliographical note

    Publisher Copyright:
    © 2020 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

    Keywords

    • CAP
    • Children
    • Diagnosis
    • Mycoplasma pneumoniae
    • PCR
    • Serology

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